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Author Topic: Commercial QB64 games  (Read 518 times)

fluffrabbit

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2013, 07:36:24 PM »
Quote from: OlDosLover on March 05, 2013, 07:33:12 PM
Hi all,
    Thanks for sharing those insights fluffrabbit. Lucky for you i dont expect you to live to my rules! However i expressed myself as you did.  A lot  of what you say makes sense. My two fav games of all time are Starcraft and Diablo2. I have played both since inception and still do today. Regardless of peoples different value systems you are  making a contribution to QB64 and for that i thank you and support you.
    Good luck with your future.
OlDosLover.
Thank you, OlDosLover.

Barrykgerdes

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2013, 11:02:49 PM »
Quote from: fluffrabbit on March 05, 2013, 06:20:54 PM

It sounds like you've never played real video games. This is scary to me. I was just talking with someone on the Internet, and he called Temple Run 2 a video game, citing that it had better graphics than Halo. Temple Run 2 is an app, not a game. It is nothing more than finger exercise.

You are correct in that assumption. Video games these days provide many programmers with a steady income and so it should. The market for computer games is immensely greater than the type of utilities I like to create. I have played the earlier types of games from the early 1980's that were the rage before colour screens and VGA. Some were quite addictive but my interests lie elsewhere these days. In those days I thought anyone over 60 was ready for the old folks home. Now when I handle technology better than when I was younger I would love to be 60 again to cash in on my knowledge.

Barry

fluffrabbit

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2013, 12:12:25 AM »
Quote from: Barrykgerdes on March 05, 2013, 11:02:49 PM
Quote from: fluffrabbit on March 05, 2013, 06:20:54 PM

It sounds like you've never played real video games. This is scary to me. I was just talking with someone on the Internet, and he called Temple Run 2 a video game, citing that it had better graphics than Halo. Temple Run 2 is an app, not a game. It is nothing more than finger exercise.

You are correct in that assumption. Video games these days provide many programmers with a steady income and so it should. The market for computer games is immensely greater than the type of utilities I like to create. I have played the earlier types of games from the early 1980's that were the rage before colour screens and VGA. Some were quite addictive but my interests lie elsewhere these days. In those days I thought anyone over 60 was ready for the old folks home. Now when I handle technology better than when I was younger I would love to be 60 again to cash in on my knowledge.

Barry
Wow, you are old. You were around before video games existed in the capacity they do now, but surely in the late 1970s/early-mid 1980s you played some of the great Atari 2600 games on which so many modern games are based. I don't know, maybe it's just a cultural thing. Some people say that video games weren't popular until Nintendo. Really, they haven't changed a whole lot, though. Sure, Pong is perhaps a little too simple, but Atari released some really awesome games shortly thereafter alongside several competing companies, and that's what defined what a video game is. Video game standards have been set in stone for over 30 years, but just now a lot of people seem to think that Pong, Solitaire, and Checkers are better examples of video games. I don't know, I guess the entertainment industry is always trying to keep it fresh because people eventually get bored with the same old crap. When people stop buying a certain type of game or watching a certain type of movie, the nature of the entertainment slowly shifts to something that people will supposedly like. It must be like every 10 years or something. Up until this point, video games have been refreshed and updated with better graphics, but due to the increasing popularity of crappy mobile hardware, game developers seem to be making less demanding games. It's a step backwards, if you ask me.

Now, don't get me wrong, I am all for QB64 being ported to Android. That would open up one more distribution channel and potentially allow for a lot better games on that platform, including porting existing QB64 games. If we could get PC games on Android, maybe people would appreciate them more than the crapps that are popular right now. No offense to anyone here. The classic QB games from the forums and PC Solitaire and all have their niche, but "hardcore gamers" play "hardcore games".

Barrykgerdes

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2013, 03:15:44 AM »
In the early 1980's before th IBM, Sega ruled the games computer market competing against Apple and Atari. Then the Commodore 64 took the computer market by storm. They all made computer games that could run in the 64K memory that was available then (dynamic memory cost $30 for 1K byte) so programmers had to develop machine code routines using say 10 bytes that would now possibly need 1MB of high level language.

Some of the popular early IBM type games were Space Quest, Kings Quest. Police Quest, Leisure suit Larry (naughty). Destiny Knight etc. Plus lots of "shoot em down" arcade style games. Improvements in data connection to the telephone line allowed the introdution of bulletin boards (internet was then only in the realms of the scientists) that allowed much interchange of "free" data. We ran a board called Tesserac on a CPM computer with two 7" floppy drives and a 10MB MFM SCSI drive.

Barry

fluffrabbit

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2013, 03:24:40 AM »
Quote from: Barrykgerdes on March 06, 2013, 03:15:44 AM
In the early 1980's before th IBM, Sega ruled the games computer market competing against Apple and Atari. Then the Commodore 64 took the computer market by storm. They all made computer games that could run in the 64K memory that was available then (dynamic memory cost $30 for 1K byte) so programmers had to develop machine code routines using say 10 bytes that would now possibly need 1MB of high level language.

Some of the popular early IBM type games were Space Quest, Kings Quest. Police Quest, Leisure suit Larry (naughty). Destiny Knight etc. Plus lots of "shoot em down" arcade style games. Improvements in data connection to the telephone line allowed the introdution of bulletin boards (internet was then only in the realms of the scientists) that allowed much interchange of "free" data. We ran a board called Tesserac on a CPM computer with two 7" floppy drives and a 10MB MFM SCSI drive.

Barry
Wow, indie game programming and online comminities go way back! I'm just watching the Angry Video Game Nerd reviews and listening to him talk about the Atari console and such, not home computers. When I hear "video game", I usually think of console games. If the computer isn't designed for kids and doesn't plug into the TV, it's not a video game console.

What about Combat or Adventure or Pitfall?

OlDosLover

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2013, 05:17:24 AM »
Hi all,
    I has an atari and as far as im concerned it was the first popular  video game console.
OlDosLover.

fluffrabbit

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2013, 08:21:47 AM »
Quote from: OlDosLover on March 06, 2013, 05:17:24 AM
Hi all,
    I has an atari and as far as im concerned it was the first popular  video game console.
OlDosLover.
Yep. And the games haven't changed all that much since the early days. In fact, we may even be coming full circle. Before the Atari 2600, there were a lot of simpler electronic games of various sorts, such as Pong (and its ripoffs), Tennis for Two, Tic-Tac-Toe, an electronic battleship game, and a few space games. The new "apps" that are coming out now are essentially Tic-Tac-Toe and Pong remakes.

Barrykgerdes

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2013, 03:14:20 PM »
If you want to go back further. The first computer game I had was a "Sands" tennis game in 1975. It was packaged as a game console that plugged into the TV Aerial connector. All these type game sets tried to emulate what was by now common dedicated consoles in the "penny arcade"

Before that we had "Star trek" using a model 28 keyboard on a main frame computer that gave a printout on the paper roll as you shot down the klingon enemy. I actually developed that game to run on a Sega computer (1981 vintage) with a colour video display 320 x 200 pixels all written in Basic. I still have the original sega handbook with many simple games programmed in Sega basic. They needed to be simple because you had to type them in and debug your typos every time you wanted to use one. Commercial games came on plugin cassets. If you had a really good tape casset player you could generally store data on tapes but they were not very reliable.

Barry

Billbo

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2013, 04:45:23 PM »
Hey, All,

I have not tried it out, but there is an Atari 2600 emulator at http://stella.sourceforge.net.
It is Stella 3.8.1. The site has links to ROM's.

Bill

codeguy

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2013, 05:21:18 PM »
i have a collision detection algo simply for the special case of rectangles. it's a series of 4 phrases colliding onscreen. this may help ya.
http://denteddisk.forums-free.com/make-an-appointment-with-the-resident-code-guru-f34.html

fluffrabbit

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2013, 08:44:45 PM »
Quote from: Barrykgerdes on March 06, 2013, 03:14:20 PM
If you want to go back further. The first computer game I had was a "Sands" tennis game in 1975. It was packaged as a game console that plugged into the TV Aerial connector. All these type game sets tried to emulate what was by now common dedicated consoles in the "penny arcade"

Before that we had "Star trek" using a model 28 keyboard on a main frame computer that gave a printout on the paper roll as you shot down the klingon enemy. I actually developed that game to run on a Sega computer (1981 vintage) with a colour video display 320 x 200 pixels all written in Basic. I still have the original sega handbook with many simple games programmed in Sega basic. They needed to be simple because you had to type them in and debug your typos every time you wanted to use one. Commercial games came on plugin cassets. If you had a really good tape casset player you could generally store data on tapes but they were not very reliable.

Barry

1981, huh? I didn't know that 320x200 color video was supported on PCs at the time! That's the resolution of Duke Nukem 3D, and that came out in 1996! I also didn't know that Sega was a popular PC company before they made the Master System. Computer games go way back.

Barrykgerdes

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Re: Commercial QB64 games
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2013, 09:23:58 PM »
Quote from: fluffrabbit on March 06, 2013, 08:44:45 PM
Quote from: Barrykgerdes on March 06, 2013, 03:14:20 PM
If you want to go back further. The first computer game I had was a "Sands" tennis game in 1975. It was packaged as a game console that plugged into the TV Aerial connector. All these type game sets tried to emulate what was by now common dedicated consoles in the "penny arcade"

Before that we had "Star trek" using a model 28 keyboard on a main frame computer that gave a printout on the paper roll as you shot down the klingon enemy. I actually developed that game to run on a Sega computer (1981 vintage) with a colour video display 320 x 200 pixels all written in Basic. I still have the original sega handbook with many simple games programmed in Sega basic. They needed to be simple because you had to type them in and debug your typos every time you wanted to use one. Commercial games came on plugin cassets. If you had a really good tape casset player you could generally store data on tapes but they were not very reliable.

Barry

1981, huh? I didn't know that 320x200 color video was supported on PCs at the time! That's the resolution of Duke Nukem 3D, and that came out in 1996! I also didn't know that Sega was a popular PC company before they made the Master System. Computer games go way back.

The first IBM PC did not have colour nor graphics. You bought a Hercules graphics card 640 x 348 if you needed graphics for a price equivalent today for as high end computer with "everything". Also a color graphics card was released for the IBM that had 320 x 200 colour or 640 x 200 mono.

The Sega had a color display but although the resolution was 320 x200 it was displayed as 4x2 sprites called by pattern to get around the shortage of memory.

Barry
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 09:34:20 PM by Barrykgerdes »

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